Inspired By Excellence & Innovation

We offer a wide range of high quality of teaching and extra-curricular activities.

The Doctor for a Day program began as the brainchild of Dr. Joy Thurman-Nguyen, who was a first-year medical student at that time in 2014. The program took root as a volunteer medical student run program. Since that first event over 6 years ago, medical student and resident volunteers have led the organization and implementation of approximately 8 events per year with 45-60 middle school and high school participants at each event.

The medical students take the lead in coordinating volunteer participants amongst their peers. The UW Network of Underrepresented Residents and Fellows (UWNURF) has worked in collaboration with the DFAD medical students’ leaders and arranged for residents and fellows from multiple specialties to teach at each event. This program began as a grassroots effort among medical students to serve the educational and mentorship needs of our most vulnerable students traditionally underrepresented in medicine. Through their efforts the program is now an institutionalized program through the medical school Center of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (CEDI). This program is rooted in service and we look forward to continuing its mission to grow it’s impact in the WWAMI region.

View Leadership

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

Doctor for a Day is comprised of hands-on stations providing opportunities for direct mentorship and engagement with medical students, residents, fellows and faculty.

  • Regional focus – our students come from across King County.

  • People not profits – students pay nothing to participate and provided food.

  • Applied learning – D4AD provides participants hands on learning opportunities.

Reach out to learn more about our programming. We also welcome community partners.

Executive Leadership

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Estell Williams, MD

Executive Director

I was born and raised in Oakland, California. I am the youngest of seven siblings, raised by a single father and the first in my family to attend college. After attending Xavier University of Louisiana, a historically black college and university (HBCU) for undergrad I had to transfer my junior year of college due to Hurricane Katrina. I graduated and was ultimately accepted into medical school at the University of Washington. Here in Seattle I completed my medical school education, residency training in general surgery and I am now faculty in the Department of Surgery, where I serve as Assistant Professor of Surgery. Through the school of medicine I act as the executive director for Doctor For A Day (DFAD) program. My passion is in healthcare workforce diversity, ecosystem programming to increase the number of underrepresented minority students in medicine and healthcare careers.

EDUCATION

  • University of San Francisco, Bachelor of Science (BS)

  • University of Washington, Doctor of Medicine (MD)

PROGRAM MANAGER

Danielle Ishem, MPA, MPH

Executive Director

Danielle Ishem is the Director of Workforce Development for the Center for Health Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (CEDI). Danielle previously worked at Seattle Children’s hospital in positions directly related to addressing the needs of those most adversely affected by the social determinants of health. Danielle has a background in International health working previously in the Department of Global Health at the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH) and serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guinea, West Africa. Danielle is a Black American and Seattle native. She holds Masters Degrees in Public Health and Public Administration from the University of Washington, and a BA in Political Science from Howard University.

EDUCATION

  • Howard University, Bachelor of Arts (BA)

  • University of Washington, Master of Public Health (MPH)

  • University of Washington, Master of Public Administration (MPA)

Acknowledgment

FOUNDER

Joy Thurman–Nguyen, MD

Founder

I was born and raised in Seattle, where I’ve lived most of my life. I’ve also spent two years in Atlanta, Georgia, while earning a master’s degree at Emory University. During medical school at the University of Washington, I founded Doctor for a Day, a program aimed at boosting the number of students of color who enter the health care field. The program targets middle and high school students in the Seattle area and offers interactive workshops in the community. I am married to my college sweetheart, and we have two beautiful and spirited daughters.

About My Practice: As a family medicine resident, I am excited to be training at Kaiser Permanente, where the model of care prioritizes the patient, which is reflected in best practices, such as evidence-based medicine. As a family physician, I view my relationships with patients as partnerships. It is my job to listen and provide information with respect and compassion and to help my patients make the best decisions for their health. At the same time, I try to be mindful how those decisions will fit into their lives. As a doctor, I have an opportunity to serve the community and advocate for change with the hope of improving health care outcomes. I am interested in serving teens and older adults. My interests also include maternal and infant health, chronic diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, prevention and health maintenance, and health equity.

How I Thrive: I enjoy spending time with my family. They help keep me grounded and inspired. We love exploring the outdoors, traveling, and having fun.

EDUCATION

  • Western Washington University, Bachelor of Science (BS)

  • Emory University, Master of Public Health (MPH)

  • University of Washington, Doctor of Medicine (MD)

DFAD Medical Student Leadership

MEDICAL STUDENT LEADER

L’Oreal Kennedy, DNP

Medical Student Leader

L’Oreal Kennedy is a first-generation college graduate and the first in her family to attend graduate school. In 2009, she graduated from the University of Washington with a Bachelor of Arts in social work, before pursuing nurse-midwifery to decrease disparities in health care among women of color.

In 2013, L’Oreal completed an accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, graduating with honors. She was selected to be a Helene Fuld Health Trust Fellow and engaged in patient safety and quality improvement education. She was a lead doula in the Birth Companions Program, a free doula service for underserved women in the Maryland area. She also worked with adolescents, women of color, clients of the International Rescue Committee, and fellow advocates to help decrease her community’s high pregnancy-related morbidity and mortality rates. In 2016, L’Oreal completed the Nurse-Midwifery Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program with honors at the University of Washington School of Nursing and then served as an advanced registered nurse practitioner in fertility/reproductive endocrinology at Seattle Reproductive Medicine. She became the founding clinician for an outpatient high-risk breast cancer screening program at Valley Medical Center in 2017, where she continued to provide hereditary cancer risk assessment and managed breast health until beginning medical school.

L’Oreal has a great interest in cancer screening and prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, particularly among women of color with hereditary mutations, and plans to pursue an Obstetrics/Gynecology residency and a fellowship in Gynecologic-Oncology.

Outside of school, she enjoys traveling with her husband and two children, skiing, trying new restaurants, and mentoring folks of color interested in health professions.

EDUCATION

  • University of Washington, Bachelor of Art (BA)

  • Johns Hopkins, Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN)

  • University of Washington, Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

  • University of Washington, Current Medical Student

MEDICAL STUDENT LEADER

Shilpa Kumar, BS

Medical Student Leader

I grew up in Issaquah, Washington. Growing up, I spent most of my summers in south India. I attended the University of Washington for undergrad, where I studied computer science in addition to my premedical requirements. After graduating, I worked as a software engineer for a little less than a year before starting medical school at UWSOM. My primary passion outside of school is classical Indian vocal music, something that has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember. I am so excited to be at UWSOM and to be a part of the Doctor for a Day team!

EDUCATION

  • University of Washington, Bachelor of Science (BS)

  • University of Washington, Current Medical Student

MEDICAL STUDENT LEADER

Philip Fallah, BS

Medical Student Leader

I am an Iranian-Chinese American born and raised in Redmond, WA. I graduated from the University of Washington in June 2018 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology while having worked as an undergraduate student researcher and COPE Health Scholar volunteer for about two years. During my gap year before medical school, I worked as an ER scribe and scribe trainer at Highline Medical Center in Burien, WA and volunteered at Seattle Children’s and ROOTS shelter for young adults experiencing homelessness. I also worked as a peer facilitator for the UW’s first ever undergraduate human anatomy lab during that year.

In my free time, I enjoy snowboarding and playing basketball as well as mentorship for undergraduate college students and high schoolers seeking health professions.

EDUCATION

  • University of Washington, Bachelor of Science (BS)

  • University of Washington, Current Medical Student

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Program Volunteers

Doctor For A Day (DFAD) programming is implemented by an exemplary team of volunteers including medical students, residents, fellows and attendings. Parents, participants and community organizers can expect that all of our volunteers have completed training in compliance with the University of Washington youth program volunteer Policies and Procedures. Volunteers also agree and adhere to a code of conduct in accordance with university standards for interacting with youth as follows:

General contact: in-person, online, verbal, physical

Expectations

  • Observe the “Rule of Three” – have at least one other adult present during all interactions with youth.
  • Limit physical contact to purposes that are consistent with the program’s mission and/or for a clear educational, developmental, or health related purpose, in the presence of another staff member, and with the consent of the youth.
  • Use program-sponsored e-mail, phone and social media accounts for communication when there is an essential educational or programmatic reason to do so.
  • Disclose any pre-existing relationships with youth in the youth program immediately to the program lead. Abide by these standards while affiliated with the youth program, despite any pre-existing personal relationships.

Discouraged or prohibited

Note: Discouraged behaviors are indicated by use of the word “avoid.”  All other behaviors are prohibited.

  • Avoid being alone with a single youth where you cannot be observed by program staff or other adults.
  • Do not act in a manner that can be perceived as physical or verbal abuse.
  • Do not discipline youth by use of physical punishment or by failing to provide the necessities of care.
  • Do not engage in purposeful communication or contact including in-person meetings, phone or other electronic communication including social networking, with youth outside of sanctioned program activities.
  • Avoid texting and other forms of electronic one-on-one communication between a single staff person and a youth.

Equitable Treatment

Expectation

  • Treat all youth equitably, i.e. fairly and consistently, regardless of their actions or behavior, sex, gender, sexual orientation, race, color, religion, culture, place of birth, age, class, ability, health, citizenship, language, or other identities.

Prohibited

  • Do not discriminate against a youth based on their sex, gender, sexual orientation, race, color, religion, culture, place of birth, age, class, ability, health, citizenship, language, or other identities.
  • Do not give personal gifts to youth or their parents, e.g., any item intended to give a youth and/or parent special attention that is not given to others.

Sexual Misconduct

Expectation

  • Understand and respect the physical and personal boundaries set by youth.

Prohibited

  • Do not engage in sexual contact of any kind. (including any verbal or physical contact that can be perceived as sexual in nature.)
  • Do not date or become romantically involved with youth.
  • Do not discuss your own or a youth’s sex life or sexual activities.
  • Do not share sexually explicit material with youth.

Safety

Expectations

  • The safety of youth must be your primary concern above all others.
  • Report any concerns for suspected abuse or neglect of a youth to authorities per University policy requirements.
  • Notify University representatives per policy requirements of any violations of these standards for interacting with youth.
  • Follow all University transportation procedures for transporting youth.

Prohibited

  • Do not possess, sell, use, or be under the influence of alcohol, marijuana, tobacco or illegal drugs while engaged in program activities or on site.
  • Do not bring or carry a weapon into the program.
  • Do not transport youth in a personal vehicle.

If you are a medical student, resident or fellow please visit the Volunteer Tab to find more information about how to volunteer and links to necessary trainings to complete prior to volunteering with our program. If you are outside the University of Washington system and would like to volunteer with DFAD please email [email protected] to request access to the training video and assessment links that must be completed to volunteer with our program. You can reach out to us at [email protected] with any additional questions.

Join Over 1,200 King County Students having attended Doctor for a Day (DFAD)